Youth for Healthy Schools

Youth for Healthy Schools responds to House Nutrition Bill

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House Nutrition Bill: More paperwork and less nutrition for poor kids

Youth for Healthy Schools strongly opposes the harmful changes in theImproving Child Nutrition and Education Act of 2016” (H.R. 5003).We support strong nutrition standards for all students and universal free meals for poor students with no stigma and bureaucratic barriers.

Specifically, the draft proposes to roll back standards on whole grains, and slow or stall the reduction of sodium in school meals based on factors like increased costs and levels of student participation. Basing the quality of food served in our schools on how much it costs amounts to telling poor students that healthy food is too good for them. This hypocritical move would also mean that school meals will be out of step with dietary guidelines for Americans.

The draft also reduces the impact of “smart snacks” standards, allowing a return to the days when students are expected to market unhealthy foods to their peers while also having to navigate a cafeteria full of chips, fries, and ice cream.

Finally, the draft would reduce the number of schools that can opt into the Community Eligibility Provision, which according to a recent report by the Center for Budget Policy Priorities has been shown to limit the paperwork required of schools and families, reduce error rates in program applications, and combat hunger by increasing children’s participation in meal programs. Currently, the provision allows schools where at least 40% of students receive safety net benefits to offer free meals to all students, and have schools use local funds to cover any costs that are not covered by federal reimbursement. This bill would raise the threshold to 60%, meaning that schools will have to go back to collecting and processing applications from each family. The Center on Budget and Policy priorities reports that 7,000 high poverty schools with over three million students would have to reinstate applications. Ultimately, our taxes will be going to paperwork rather than to meals and education, punishing poor students in communities around the country – be they urban, suburban, rural or reservations.

“I read about the House’s reauthorization bill and it’s very discouraging. Our families in Southwest Denver already have to work hard to make sure we have access to fresh, healthy food. Does the federal government really care about the health of students like me? About hungry kids in my school who have trouble concentrating?” questioned Estefania Torres, 9th grader and member of Padres y Jovenes Unidos.

Youth for Healthy Schools promotes and implements evidence-based practices to increase the availability and affordability of fresh, local and healthy food in our schools and communities. We support full funding and implementation of farm to school programs, training and technical assistance for cafeteria staff, renovation of kitchens for the fresh preparation of food, and free school meals to high poverty schools.

 

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Youth United for Change wins commitment from the School District of Philadelphia to do a full inventory of water fountains in all public schools

Youth United for Change (YUC) in partnership with other community and advocacy groups, won a commitment from the School District of Philadelphia to do a full inventory of water fountains throughout all public schools. The announcement comes on the heels of a recent City Council Hearing on the State of Water in Philadelphia. YUC members were in attendance and provided testimony. Getting the district to agree to a full assessment of the water infrastructure in all SDP schools met one of YUC’s demands for water access. This is a big victory for the campaign, but there is still much work to be done. YUC will continue to press for the availability of clean and safe drinking water for all Philadelphia students; with $88 million dollars of unexpected local tax revenues, this windfall could be transformative in not only addressing issues of water access but also broader material conditions within schools. A big shout out to the Food Trust, Education Law Center-PA, CHOP PolicyLab, the Coalition of 100 Black Women, the PFT, PennEnvironment and the Campaign for Lead Free Water for helping creating the conditions for greater oversight regarding Philadelphia’s water

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Youth Convene for Healthier Schools as Childhood Nutrition Act Reauthorization Approaches

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Nijmie Dzurinko (215) 667-0066

nijmie@fcyo.org

 

Youth Convene for Healthier Schools

Young People of Color to Congress: Keep Moving Forward on School Food

 

Los Angeles – While most teens are enjoying their summer vacation, members of the Youth for Healthy Schools advocacy network will be traveling from 12 states to meet at The California Endowment in Los Angeles, for three days starting July 30, to share strategies about how to make their schools healthier places to be. At the top of their agenda: school food.

 

“We support Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack in demanding that Congress uphold strong school food standards in the upcoming reauthorization of the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act (HFFK),” remarked Sandra García of the Southwest Workers Union in San Antonio. “This isn’t child’s play – we may be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than our parents.”

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in three U.S. children is overweight. The USDA counts thirty million youth that eat school lunch every day, and two-thirds of those do so out of need. For almost 20 million young people throughout our country, school meals are a primary source of nutrition.

 

These young people know firsthand what it’s like to live in communities where healthy options are scarce. “We traced the path of students walking to school and all they see is fast food chains with food high in fat and sodium,” shared Isaías Vásquez of Padres y Jóvenes Unidos in Denver. “When that is the alternative, it’s crucial that schools only serve healthy food.”

 

Implemented after the 2010 passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, the enhanced National School Lunch Program’s nutritional guidelines, which include more fruits and vegetables, more whole grains, and limits on fat and salt, are now in their third year. The future of these standards is being debated in Congress.

 

Despite these common-sense measures that polls show most parents and voters agree with, other groups including corporate food and agriculture giants have hotly contested their implementation and reauthorization.

 

“It’s sad that some members of Congress seem to care more about the health of corporate profits than the next generation of youth,” reflected Jamal Jones of the Baltimore Algebra Project.

 

“Youth of today have way more power to change our society than what we’re taking advantage of. The health of our schools’ food directly affects us and it’s our duty to change it for the better!” said Andrea Boakye of Youth Empowered Solutions in Charlotte, N.C.

 

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About Youth for Healthy Schools: Youth for Healthy Schools is a collaborative organizing network of 15 youth and parent organizations of color in 12 states leading a movement for school and community wellness as part of the Healthy Communities II Initiative of the Funders Collaborative on Youth Organizing. For more information, visit www.youthforhealthyschools.com.

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